• On 03/21/2012, Bill Jenkins of Eastpointe asked:

    Can I get Ducth Elm Disease if I burn diseased Elm?

    Arbor Pro Answers:

    Only if you are an Elm Tree. No, the disease is spread between Elm Trees by a Bark Beetle or through adjacent root systems. The disease is only found in elm trees.
  • On 03/16/2012, Donald Howard of Southgate, Mi asked:

    I have a large Black Walnut tree in my yard. Do you want to buy it?

    Arbor Pro Answers:

    Generally, unless it is a 35" DBH and up (Diameter @ Brest Height), It will not be highly valuable. You need to contact a log broker and have it evaluated. We would be happy to process and handle the tree on your behalf.
  • On 02/12/2012, Jerry Neighbors of Eastpointe asked:

    How high can you go in tree to trim it? How would you know if the branches are dead if the tree does not have leaves?

    Arbor Pro Answers:

    We have equipment that gets our trimmers 60 or so feet in the air. Trees that we work on that are higher than that, the trimmer would climb the rest of the way up. When a tree is dormant, the dead branches are visibly dry and discolored, brittle, with a coarse texture that the trimmer looks for that indidcates dead tissue. Also, the living stems have the spring leaf and flower bud that is visible on all varieties of trees while dormant.
  • On 02/12/2012, Todd Jones of Grosse Pointe Farms asked:

    Can you grind a stump that is in a back yard that has a 36" gate opening?

    Arbor Pro Answers:

    Yes we can. Our smaller stump grinding machinery has the ability to go through a 34" opening and get to MOST areas in the backyard.
  • On 12/19/2011, William Price of Redford asked:

    Can the Elm Bark Beetle fly for miles?

    Arbor Pro Answers:

    In search of food or a mate, yes.
  • On 12/17/2011, Steve Utash of Bloomfield Township asked:

    Can you help me with how to dig up an evergreen? When is the best time to do this?

    Arbor Pro Answers:

    The best time to dig up an evergreen is after the new sesonal growth has grown in and is "hardened off" or matured. This is usually in August, September (in our area). As far as digging it up (harvesting), we have a tutorial you can view that can walk you through the process.
  • On 12/14/2011, Fred Portliacombre of Center Line asked:

    How do I make my Apple Tree have better fruit. The apples are small and puckered.

    Arbor Pro Answers:

    To improve the size of your fruit, you will need to have fewer branches that will produce fruit. In other words trim and thin out the branches and remove some all together. (If you are going to try this yourself, there are some protocals to follow.)This is how an apple orchard gets a larger apple to grow. The tree makes less fruit, but what it makes is bigger. As far as the puckers on your apples, this is very hard to control. It is caused by Apple Scab Fungis and is usually mistaken for "worm holes". It is unsightly but not a health risk. The fungicides used to control Apple Scab are worse for you than the puckers caused by the virtually harmless fungis.
  • On 12/14/2011, Paul Frankle of St. Clair Shores asked:

    I just cut a large branch off my tree. How do I stop the tree from bleeding?

    Arbor Pro Answers:

    Sorry, this time of year sap pressure is high and cut limbs will produce sap in most trees. The bleeding is unsightly but is not considered a health risk. Stopping the bleeding is not possible.